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Hip pain

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watchie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08 March 2018 at 7:44pm
Hi, 

I started riding a recumbent last year and after a couple of rides of just 25 miles in one week (not something I thought was excessive) I developed hip pain in my right hip. That was in August 2017. 

After a while when it didn't sort itself out, I saw a doctor and I am now receiving physio for it, but it still hasn't gone completely.

I am not asking for medical advice simply trying to find out if it is something that other people have experienced and if they found out the cause.

I am not 100% sure it was riding the recumbent that brought on the hip pain but that was the notable exercise I did at the time.
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RoyMacdonald View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RoyMacdonald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2018 at 8:20pm
There could be many variables here. Was the bike set up correctly for leg length? Did it have the correct length cranks? Did you overdo unaccustomed exercise the first week? Ligament damage is a pig to heal. Did the seat suit you? 

Short cranks will correct a lot of problems. 

I have a major spinal problem and was in pain 24/7 and was told in 1993 by the consultant I would be in wheelchair within five years. I started riding a Kingcycle in 1994 and found that I was free of pain for around an hour after riding at first but that time of being pain free gradually extended and I am still able to walk without pain although my spine is 2" shorter than it was in 1993. But that's just made me more aerodynamic. 

People vary so much there is no way one person's experience can directly translate to someone else's but I doubt it's just the fact you are on a recumbent. Did the scans of the hip joint show any issues? Or is it in the soft tissue? 

Roy
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watchie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watchie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2018 at 10:30am
Hi Roy,

Thanks for the info. 

The x-rays showed nothing unusual for my age (56) and the physio is a bit perplexed and thinks it is tendon damage.

As regards setting up the recumbent (ice trike) I just followed the literature and haven't really thought to play with it much. I had read a lot about fitting a bike for an upright position but not for a recumbent. Something for me to look into.

I did do two rides of 25 miles in a week and whether that was too much I would be surprised as I bike to work but admittedly not in the recumbent position.

Thanks and I will look for more info or ask further questions about getting a correct fit on a recumbent.

cheers 


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Yanto View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yanto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2018 at 6:49am
Quite often the best/most comfortable set up on a recumbent is to have the pedals slightly further away than the "norm" for an upright bike. The norm being with the heel of your cycling shoe on the pedal and a straight leg.

Also it does take a few months of regular riding to become fully adapted to the recumbent position, there is always the temptation to expect much i.e. better speeds at first, and when it doesn't happen to try and push too hard, when the reality is that speed will increase as you become more adapted.

I changed the seating position at the beginning of the year and am still fine tuning the pedal position, even a few mm affects the pedal feel and also stress/strain on muscles and joints.


Edited by Yanto - 12 March 2018 at 6:53am
Ian, retired.
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RoyMacdonald View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RoyMacdonald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2018 at 5:07pm
Originally posted by Yanto Yanto wrote:

Quite often the best/most comfortable set up on a recumbent is to have the pedals slightly further away than the "norm" for an upright bike. The norm being with the heel of your cycling shoe on the pedal and a straight leg.

Also it does take a few months of regular riding to become fully adapted to the recumbent position, there is always the temptation to expect much i.e. better speeds at first, and when it doesn't happen to try and push too hard, when the reality is that speed will increase as you become more adapted.

I changed the seating position at the beginning of the year and am still fine tuning the pedal position, even a few mm affects the pedal feel and also stress/strain on muscles and joints.
 
I agree with that. I found I'm very sensitive to length position. Maybe because my legs are slightly different to each other but I found that a feeling of strain can be especially is noticeable when spinning fast as often happens when you are trying to get that last bit of use of the gears on a downhill. My legs can feel strained if it is as little as 2mm different from what I feel is right. You need to allow for give in the seat as well especially if you have webbing, mesh or foam. Remember its not the padding you sit on but the pressure on the back of the pelvic girdle. So load up the pressure on the seat when adjusting the length. The stress on the body will be less with short cranks because you will spin faster and not be pressing on the joints as much but build up slowly to acclimatise the muscles and ligaments. 
 
I used to live on a hill so I would go on the trainer for 10 minutes to warm up before I went on the road. Now I don't live on a hill I cycle in lower gears not spinning at greater than 90 rpm for 10 minutes to warm up.
 
Roy
 
Roy 
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